Dr. David Wallace

Dr. David Wallace 

Candidate Campus visit on Monday, March 26 •  Presentation at 2:30pm in LIBRARY 244


David Wallace began his career in higher education as a volunteer in the writing center at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania where he earned an MA in Rhetoric and Linguistics in 1987.  He earned a Ph.D. in Rhetoric at Carnegie Mellon University in 1991 and while there he was a research fellow at the National Center for the Study of Writing and Literacy at Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon. From 1991 to 2002 he was an assistant and then associate professor of rhetoric and composition at Iowa State University (ISU) where he helped launch a new Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Professional Communication. In the 11 years he spent at ISU, he taught graduate and undergraduate courses in rhetorical history and theory, research methods, and composition pedagogy. His research focused on the challenges of teaching writing in first-year composition classrooms and looked particularly at how those challenges intersected with issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation.

In 2002 he moved to Orlando, Florida to become associate professor and then professor of Writing and Rhetoric in the Department of English at the University of Central Florida. There, he helped launch a Ph.D. program in Texts and Technology and taught a wide range of courses, including first-year composition, upper-division writing courses, rhetorical history and theory, feminist theory, and the Bible as literature. In 2008, he became chair of the Department of English, and two years later, he became the founding chair of the Department of Writing and Rhetoric and helped create a comprehensive writing program for the university.

In 2012, he became dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the California State University, Long Beach, overseeing 28 departments and programs in the Humanities and Social Sciences.  As dean, he increased funding for faculty research, raised $15 million in philanthropic funds for the college, and oversaw efforts that resulted in a rise in the college’s four-year graduation rate to 44% in the 2017-18.